No truth in the news, no news in the truth

The public radio show This American Life has retracted an entire storyline told by comedian and self-described Apple fanboy Mike Daisey that aired in early January after Daisey’s translator said he made up significant details of the tale.

via  Yahoo! News.

According to Daisey’s translator, whom another reporter tracked down, she never saw the worst of the abuses that Daisey claimed. Abuses such as child labor, poisoned workers, and armed guards. Why didn’t the professional journalists at This American Life talk to the translator to corroborate his story? “Daisey told them he lost her cell phone number.That is some really amazing effort there guys. Really what that tells me is that it fit with what the producers felt should be right, so it must be right. Heck, I think that might actually be the definition of prejudice.

Anytime someone just knows they are right, but are caught in the wrong with a big smelly bag of lies on your doorstep, you just know what they are going to say:

Daisey, however, stands by his original storyline. “It uses a combination of fact, memoir, and dramatic license to tell its story, and I believe it does so with integrity,” Daisey said on his blog.

That’s right, its fake but accurate. I don’t think integrity means what Daisey thinks it means. And trust once lost is hard to regain. But I don’t put much trust in the media any way. There may be awful things going on in factories in China, but when you know they’ll lie, I’m sorry, use dramatic license, then how can you believe anything they say?

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Comments

  • Dave H  On March 16, 2012 at 6:31 pm

    I just watched an old (ca. 1976) episode of Nova where they challenged Erich von Daniken, the “ancient astronauts” author, about the inaccuracies and outright falsehoods in his first book, “Chariots of the Gods.” He used the very same arguments: “I didn’t actually see it, but I heard about it.” “I didn’t take that photo, someone else did.” “I used dramatic license to make a point.”

    Part of me wants to write books like that because people want to believe, and it seems criminal to not take their money.But this honest streak keeps getting in my way.

  • Strengthology  On March 18, 2012 at 8:10 am

    This guy is an idiot, he wrote what everyone wanted to read, what everyone assumed was going on at Foxconn. However, most people won’t care about the “dramtic license” use…they’ll actually be relieved, because they can now enjoy their iPads guilt-free.

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